DMA Dialogues | The Greek Hospital St Sofronios: Benevolence and Community Building in the Cosmopolitan Milieu of late 19th‑and early 20th‑century Alexandria
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The Greek Hospital St Sofronios: Benevolence and Community Building in the Cosmopolitan Milieu of late 19th‑and early 20th‑century Alexandria

The Greek Hospital St Sofronios: Benevolence and Community Building in the Cosmopolitan Milieu of late 19th‑and early 20th‑century Alexandria

The role of hospitals in promoting charity and philanthropy has not been fully documented in the existing historiography. Following the 1882 crisis in Egypt, Greeks in Alexandria founded a new hospital using British and Egyptian indemnities, loans and donor funds. By examining the operation of St Sofronios Hospital and its staff, this article historicises the development and position of the Greek community in late 19th and early 20th century Alexandria. It argues that the hospital, under the patronage of the Koinotita, consolidated the Greek community in British-controlled Alexandria and, through the institutionalisation of philanthropy, forged intra-communal philanthropic structures, coherence and social hierarchies. At the same time, St Sofronios was responsive to interethnic communication and cooperation.