DMA Dialogues | South Asia’s Tibetan Refugee Community Is Shrinking, Imperiling Its Long-Term Future
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South Asia’s Tibetan Refugee Community Is Shrinking, Imperiling Its Long-Term Future

South Asia’s Tibetan Refugee Community Is Shrinking, Imperiling Its Long-Term Future

The number of Tibetan refugees in India, Nepal, and Bhutan has been on a steady decline since the mid-2000s, posing a threat to the future of an exile community that has developed a robust governance, cultural, educational, and religious structure. While the Tibetan government-in-exile has become a model for displaced communities, a series of factors have contributed to the shrinking population in South Asia, as this article describes.