DMA Dialogues | Maintaining Philanthropy: The Greek Alexandrian Institutions after the Exodus of the Early 1960s
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Maintaining Philanthropy: The Greek Alexandrian Institutions after the Exodus of the Early 1960s

Maintaining Philanthropy: The Greek Alexandrian Institutions after the Exodus of the Early 1960s

The departure of most Greeks from Egypt at the beginning of the 1960s raised questions in the community about how it should readjust its presence at an institutional level. This article examines how the Greek Koinotēta of Alexandria (GKA) operated as both a local and diasporic institution in periods of contraction, in terms of size and finances, and analyzes the adjustment policies it undertook concerning its institutional property and real estate. Despite the community’s demographic shrinkage in the 1960s and 1970s, the GKA was assigned its role as the value keeper and moral guide for the children of the community through its educational institutions and orphanages, having the support of the Greek representatives, in this case the consular authorities. Even though the GKA faced serious financial difficulties in the 1960s, it strived to find strategies of adaptation to maintain its agency and social, political and economic capital.