DMA Dialogues | Disability Inclusion in Disaster Risk Management – Assessment in the Caribbean Region
99859
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Disability Inclusion in Disaster Risk Management – Assessment in the Caribbean Region

World Bank

Disability Inclusion in Disaster Risk Management – Assessment in the Caribbean Region

Persons with disabilities make up just
one of many groups in society that are systematically
marginalized and disadvantaged. Gender, ethnic and religious
diversity, poverty, age, homelessness, levels of education
and literacy, gender preference and diversity, and
geographic isolation are just some of the characteristics
that can define social exclusion. The World Bank and the
Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR),
with support from the Canadian government, have established
the Canada–Caribbean Resilience Facility (CRF) as a
single-donor trust fund aimed at achieving more effective
and coordinated gender-informed climate-resilient
preparedness, recovery, and public financial management
practices in nine targeted CRF-eligible countries. The CRF
is supporting, disability inclusive disaster risk management
(DRM) as an essential element in building this societal
resilience. The primary purpose of this assessment is to
understand gaps better in the inclusion of persons with
disabilities in national disaster risk management (DRM) and
climate resilience (CR) processes and strategies in Antigua
and Barbuda, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica,
Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Suriname.
The report is based on the recognition that collectively
people with disabilities are systematically marginalized and
excluded from full and equal participation in society and
societal processes. Primarily, the reasons are barriers to
access that are both structural and nonstructural. These
barriers can be removed or mitigated through effective
social policy, implementation of existing norms and
standards, and public will. The assessment will provide
recommendations that make preparedness and recovery efforts
more disability inclusive.